1585 Broadway

 1585 Broadway is the headquarters of Morgan Stanley, on the west side of Broadway, north of Duffy Square in Midtown Manhattan.


Even before 1585 Broadway began to rise over Duffy Square, its developer, David S. Solomon, had signed law firm Proskauer Rose to a 20-year lease for 365,000 square feet (33,900 square meters). A notable achievement at any time, the deal was a milestone in a market where a growing number of new buildings were competing heavily for a shrinking number of tenants.

In December 1991, the original developer, 1585 Broadway Associates, controlled by Solomon, filed for bankruptcy, leaving unfinished building construction, stalled leasing, and strained tenant relationships.

A consortium of banks then gained control of the asset through the bankruptcy process and hired Hines Interests Limited Partnership to manage the property.

Morgan Stanley bought the building for $176 million in August 1993 and moved in two years later. Currently, it uses the building as its world headquarters.
The building is featured in the movie Down to Earth as the skyscraper from which a failing businessman jumps to his death.

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277 Park Avenue

 277 Park Avenue is an office building in New York City and is the current home of the JPMorgan Chase's Investment Banking Division. JP Morgan's takeover of Bear Stearns in 2008 will mean most employees will be moved to 383 Madison Avenue to reduce the leased real estate footprint in Midtown Manhattan.

Previous tenants have included Penthouse Magazine, Schlumberger, Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, Continental Grain Company and Chemical Bank (Predecessor to today's JPMorgan Chase). The office building opened on July 13, 1964. An apartment building designed by McKim, Mead, and White previously occupied the site.
It stands at 687 feet (209 m) tall, with 50 floors.

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55 Water Street

55 Water Street is a 687ft (209m) tall skyscraper in Lower Manhattan, New York City. It was completed in 1972 and has 53 floors. Emery Roth & Sons designed the building, which is tied with 277 Park Avenue as the 40th tallest building in New York City. When it was completed it was the largest office building in the world, and is still the largest in New York by floor area. The Sears Tower in Chicago is the only building in the United States with a bigger floor area. In an arrangement with the Office of Lower Manhattan Development, it was built on a superblock created from four adjoining city blocks. The Whitney Museum of American Art established a branch museum in the building. Space is rented for a token fee and the operating cost are being paid for by several Wall Street corporations. On the north side of the tower is a 15-story wing with a sloping facade and terraces facing the river. In front of the wing is an elevated plaza, known as the Elevated Acre, which is reachable by a high escalator ride. The 4,800 m² plaza was designed by M. Paul Friedberg & Assocs., and has same red brick tiles as his Jeannette Park to the south of the tower. The building, its plazas and Jeannette Park have been renovated and redesigned by Lee S Jablin, Harman Jablin Architects.[1] It was originally planned as a series of high-level public spaces along East River, to be connected with walkways running above the street level.

It was the last major building built by Uris Brothers.
It is the headquarters of EmblemHealth.[3] HIP Health Plan of New York, which became a part of EmblemHealth, moved there with 2,000 employees in October 2004. It was the largest corporate relocation in downtown Manhattan following the September 11 attacks.

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HSBC Bank Building

The Marine Midland Building (also HSBC Bank Building) is a 51-story office building located at 140 Broadway in Manhattan's financial district. The building, completed in 1967, is 688 ft (209.7 m) tall and is known for the distinctive sculpture at its entrance, Isamu Noguchi's Cube. Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the man who designed the building, had originally proposed a monolith type sculpture, but it was deemed to be too expensive. It is currently owned by Union Investment.
The building is approximately 677 feet (206 m) high, measuring approximately 1,170,000 rentable square feet (111,000 square meters).

The building was built by a consortium headed by Harry Helmsley and Marine Midland Bank received naming rights as part of its lease agreement which initially covered the two basement and first 20 floors. Controlling interest in Marine Midland was purchased by HSBC in 1980 and they secured 100% ownership in the 1987; the name of the bank was changed to HSBC Bank USA in 1998. Today the building is known by both names, but is more often referred to by its older name to distinguish it from the other HSBC Buildings.

A bombing occurred on the 8th floor on August 20, 1969, injuring 20 people. The bomb, which police estimated to be the equivalent of 25 sticks of dynamite, was placed in a hallway just off the elevators some time during the evening and it exploded at around 10:30PM. The injured were on the night shift in the bank's stock bookkeeping department and were working on the other side of the corridor wall. Fortunately, the inside of this wall was lined with floor-to-ceiling automated file units that weighed 3 tons each and which absorbed most of the blast. Without them, the 20 injuries would all have been fatalities. The blast moved the file units about a foot, blew out all the windows on that side of the building and opened a 5-foot (1.5 m) hole in the reinforced concrete floor. The bomber, Sam Melville, was convicted of this and seven other 1969 Manhattan bombings and sentenced to 18 years in prison. He was killed by a state sharpshooter during the Attica Prison riots in September 1971.
The primary tenant of the building as of 2010 is Brown Brothers Harriman, leasing some 430,000 ft² (40,000 m²) in 2003. BBH moved to the site from their trademark location at 59 Wall Street, filling a vacancy left after HSBC moved their primary New York offices out of the building, to the HSBC building at 452 5th Ave.

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Solow Building

 The Solow Building, located at 9 West 57th Street, is a Manhattan skyscraper designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill's Gordon Bunshaft and built in 1974. It is located just west of Fifth Avenue, sandwiched between the 57th and 58th Street, next to such prominent buildings as the Bergdorf Goodman department store and the Plaza Hotel. Consisting of 50 stories and 689 ft. (210 m), the building's only competitor by height in the neighborhood is the GM Building, located one block north and east. Floors above the 23rd floor offer a virtually unobstructed view of northern Manhattan and a complete view of Central Park.

One of the notable aesthetic attributes of the building is the concave vertical slope of its north and south facades, on 57th and 58th Street. This is similar to another of Bunshaft's creations, the W. R. Grace Building, which is no coincidence, as he had used the initial, rejected façade design for the Solow Building in his design for the Grace Building.

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Americas Tower

 Americas Tower, also known as 1177 Avenue of the Americas, is a 50-storey, 692-foot (211 m) office tower in Manhattan, New York City, standing at West 45th Street.
Construction began in 1989 and was expected to be completed in 1991. This schedule was altered when construction was halted in December 1989 due to lawsuits. In February 1991, construction resumed.
The tower is designed with a mixture of art deco and postmodern styles. The façade, which is a reddish-pink color, is made of polished granite. The tower was sold in 2002 for US$ 500 million to a group of German-American investors.

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